OUR HISTORY

OUR HISTORY

The Pollard Theatre site was initially occupied by a large wooden dry goods store, built shortly after the Land Run of 1889. The current building, of brick and native stone, was constructed in 1901 as the Patterson Furniture Store. It also served as the local funeral parlor since it was a tradition for cabinet makers to manage the town’s need for coffins.

In 1919 George Pollard purchased the building and converted it into a vaudeville theatre known as the Pollard Theatre, featuring live acts and silent movies. With the advent of talkies in 1929, A.R. Powell renovated the theatre for movies only, reducing the stage area, adding one of the earliest sound systems in the state, and renaming it the Melba. When the Melba closed its doors in 1984, the Guthrie Arts & Humanities Council restored the theater to its former use as a live venue, adding a 30-foot proscenium stage, raising the roof for a 14 line, double-purchase fly-rail system, and renaming the venue the Pollard Theater.

In 1982 the Guthrie Arts and Humanities Council was established to nurture the arts and enhance tourism for historic Guthrie – Oklahoma’s territorial and original state capital. Early endeavors included a concert series at Guthrie’s Scottish Rite Temple, bringing artists such as Henry Mancini, Lena Horne, Victor Borge, and Luciano Pavarotti to local audiences. In 1987 the Pollard Theatre Company was formed as a partnership with nearby Langston University. When state budget cuts terminated this partnership in 2003, the Pollard board elected to continue operations independently.

Guthrie is a center of tourism due to its wealth of restored Victorian buildings and its status as the territorial capital and first state capital of Oklahoma. Furthermore, Guthrie is a focal point for Oklahoma’s thriving film community. Visitors come to enjoy the gift and antique shops, restaurants, bed and breakfasts, museums, entertainment, history, and architecture. The Pollard serves as a primary anchor of the local economy and has been the center of entertainment in downtown Guthrie for nearly a hundred years now. 

The Pollard Theatre site was initially occupied by a large wooden dry goods store, built shortly after the Land Run of 1889. The current building, of brick and native stone, was constructed in 1901 as the Patterson Furniture Store. It also served as the local funeral parlor since it was a tradition for cabinet makers to manage the town’s need for coffins.

In 1919 George Pollard purchased the building and converted it into a vaudeville theatre known as the Pollard Theatre, featuring live acts and silent movies. With the advent of talkies in 1929, A.R. Powell renovated the theatre for movies only, reducing the stage area, adding one of the earliest sound systems in the state, and renaming it the Melba. When the Melba closed its doors in 1984, the Guthrie Arts & Humanities Council restored the theater to its former use as a live venue, adding a 30-foot proscenium stage, raising the roof for a 14 line, double-purchase fly-rail system, and renaming the venue the Pollard Theater.

In 1982 the Guthrie Arts and Humanities Council was established to nurture the arts and enhance tourism for historic Guthrie – Oklahoma’s territorial and original state capital. Early endeavors included a concert series at Guthrie’s Scottish Rite Temple, bringing artists such as Henry Mancini, Lena Horne, Victor Borge, and Luciano Pavarotti to local audiences. In 1987 the Pollard Theatre Company was formed as a partnership with nearby Langston University. When state budget cuts terminated this partnership in 2003, the Pollard board elected to continue operations independently.

Guthrie is a center of tourism due to its wealth of restored Victorian buildings and its status as the territorial capital and first state capital of Oklahoma. Furthermore, Guthrie is a focal point for Oklahoma’s thriving film community. Visitors come to enjoy the gift and antique shops, restaurants, bed and breakfasts, museums, entertainment, history, and architecture. The Pollard serves as a primary anchor of the local economy and has been the center of entertainment in downtown Guthrie for nearly a hundred years now. 

The Pollard Theatre site was initially occupied by a large wooden dry goods store, built shortly after the Land Run of 1889. The current building, of brick and native stone, was constructed in 1901 as the Patterson Furniture Store. It also served as the local funeral parlor since it was a tradition for cabinet makers to manage the town’s need for coffins.

In 1919 George Pollard purchased the building and converted it into a vaudeville theatre known as the Pollard Theatre, featuring live acts and silent movies. With the advent of talkies in 1929, A.R. Powell renovated the theatre for movies only, reducing the stage area, adding one of the earliest sound systems in the state, and renaming it the Melba. When the Melba closed its doors in 1984, the Guthrie Arts & Humanities Council restored the theater to its former use as a live venue, adding a 30-foot proscenium stage, raising the roof for a 14 line, double-purchase fly-rail system, and renaming the venue the Pollard Theater.

In 1982 the Guthrie Arts and Humanities Council was established to nurture the arts and enhance tourism for historic Guthrie – Oklahoma’s territorial and original state capital. Early endeavors included a concert series at Guthrie’s Scottish Rite Temple, bringing artists such as Henry Mancini, Lena Horne, Victor Borge, and Luciano Pavarotti to local audiences. In 1987 the Pollard Theatre Company was formed as a partnership with nearby Langston University. When state budget cuts terminated this partnership in 2003, the Pollard board elected to continue operations independently.

Guthrie is a center of tourism due to its wealth of restored Victorian buildings and its status as the territorial capital and first state capital of Oklahoma. Furthermore, Guthrie is a focal point for Oklahoma’s thriving film community. Visitors come to enjoy the gift and antique shops, restaurants, bed and breakfasts, museums, entertainment, history, and architecture. The Pollard serves as a primary anchor of the local economy and has been the center of entertainment in downtown Guthrie for nearly a hundred years now. 

OUR SPONSORS

OUR SPONSORS

120 W. Harrison Ave, Guthrie, OK 73044 - Phone: 405-282-2800

Pollard Theatre Company is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, whose mission is to produce professional theatre that engages and inspires Oklahoma’s audiences, and contributes to the quality of life and economy of our community and state. Additional assistance is provided by the Oklahoma Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Pollard Theatre Company is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, whose mission is to produce professional theatre that engages and inspires Oklahoma’s audiences, and contributes to the quality of life and economy of our community and state. Additional assistance is provided by the Oklahoma Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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